Meet the StopSOP Slate!

    These 22 lawyers and one paralegal are running on a platform to eliminate the compelled Statement of Principles. They represent regions across the province. You may vote for candidates outside of your own region. Please consider voting for all of them (plus any non-slate candidates endorsed by StopSOP) and ONLY them to ensure that we achieve our goal of electing a Convocation that adheres to its statutory mandate, and gets out of the business of controlling the thoughts and speech of its members. 

    For ease of voting, download the alphabetical list here, or print directly from this webpage.

     

    I am running for Bencher with two objectives:

    • to give voice to concerns about the EDI initiative; and
    • to meaningfully enlarge the public’s access to effective legal representation.

    Self-regulation requires that we consider the impact we have. We help to create our society. That means, we cannot allow a core value of our profession – the sanctity of independent thinking – to be overrun by a well-meant but ill-defined idea.

    EDI Initiative

    I am pained to say that I cannot support the Statement of Principles as presented by the Society. It is too vague, and the terms are not sufficiently defined. Many members worry that it amounts to “compelled speech.” This initiative has caused a rift in our profession.

    Yes, we need to actively work to rectify imbalances in our profession. Education, broad consultation with members and open discussion forums will do more to achieve these goals than requiring licensees to check a box.

    If elected, I will do my utmost to: listen to your concerns, honour your confidence and work on building consensus.

    Access to Justice

    The second requirement that flows from self-regulation is that we must represent the society we serve. We must ensure public access to effective legal advice and representation.

    Lawyers in sole practice and small firms are most often the first point of contact for individuals requiring a lawyer. The Society must invest further in tools and mentoring programs to build a diverse and inclusive profession.

    Her Excellency the Right Honourable Adrienne Clarkson challenged us:

    Think of the many transactions that can't be done in our society without the help of a lawyer. The purchase of a house, for example…

    It is so important to realize that how they [first-time home-buyers] are treated by the legal profession will reinforce, and perhaps even create, their view of society – for the good, hopefully.

    Effective governance requires that we serve the public interest; therefore, we must enhance access to justice.

    I offer my service as Bencher. I will advocate for our profession, to help bring us into alignment with the distinct yet cohesive values of our profession and our country.


    Education

    • 1978          LL.B. University of Windsor
    • 1980          Called to Ontario Bar

    Practice: in real estate, wills, estate planning and estate administration

    • 1980-1982 Sole Practitioner
    • 1982-1986 Associate at Lobl, Recht, Freedman and Danson, Barristers and Solicitors
    • 1986-1988 Partner at Cobban/Mogan, Barristers and Solicitors
    • 1988-2011 Sole Practitioner
    • 2012-present Associate at Devry Smith Frank LLP, Lawyers and Mediators

    Volunteer

    • Speaker at community events on law-related topics including “Why You Should Make A Will”
    • Team Captain for the annual “Coldest Night of the Year” walkathon in downtown Toronto

     Teaching

    • Real Estate section of the Bar Admission Course

    Affiliations

    • Member of Armenian Bar Association, a worldwide organization of Armenian lawyers